Tory Leadership race – Theresa May, in Maggie’s footsteps

Meticulous, fierce, determined, exactly the type of leader the country needs for the post-Brexit negotiations.

by Salvatore Murtas – Published on ItaloEuropeo on 02/07/2016

http://www.italoeuropeo.co.uk/2016/07/02/tory-leadership-race-theresa-may-in-maggie-s-footsteps/

Conservative Party annual conference 2015

Home Secretary Theresa May delivers her speech to the Conservative Party conference at Manchester Central. (Photo credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire)

The British political scene has gifted us with 10 days of absolute drama-galore. Not for the faint-hearted, that is, because we went overnight from being a fundamental member of the EU to one destined to irrelevance in shaping its future, from having a successful Prime Minister to a resigning one, from preparing to count the votes for the seemingly pre-destined histrionic Boris Johnson as the party leader to seeing him pulling out of the race following one of the shrewdest, most treacherous political acts in recent history.

Wow! If times weren’t so damningly serious and uncertain, I’d say I’ve enjoyed being bombarded by the unfolding events, by such an outburst of dramatic developments.

 

But down to the point, the race for the Tory party leadership has taken a significant swerve to one quite unexpected outcome. With the premature departure of Boris Johnson, who not so valiantly turned his back on the country following Gove’s announcement – a superbly deceitful act of betrayal that outwitted BoJo and left literally everyone jaw-dropped – the contest has seen all attention focused on Theresa May.

The gutsy Home Secretary reminds me of Maggie Thatcher, no so much for her thundering personality – on the contrary Mrs May is quite posed and defiantly cool – as for the sturdiness of her character and action. She is not the type of person who would shy away from the mandate of the British people to leave the EU, and at the same time she would provide a strong, determined leadership to present the most compelling case in the Brexit negotiations with a greatly needed touch of pragmatism and realism, which obviously Gove lacks.

Most of the Tory MPs have already announced May as their preference for the new party leader and Prime Minister, proving the extreme confidence in her ability, meticulousness, commitment and dedication.

In her candidacy speech, the longest serving Home Secretary in the last 60 years showed intelligence, charisma and determination, talking about the need to unite the nation and to conduct the Brexit negotiations with the utmost competence and seriousness.

 

“Our country needs strong, proven leadership to steer us through this period of economic and political uncertainty, and to negotiate the best possible terms as we leave the European Union. We need leadership that can unite our party and our country,” convincingly announced Mrs. May, showing that she understands the reasons behind the will of the majority of the British people to leave the EU.

But even more importantly, she was in the side-lines of the Remain campaign – mainly due to the fact that she fully understands the implications of the failures of the EU in managing the immigration crisis – indicating her sense of realism. The immigration crisis in the EU has worked as a pretty strong point in mobilizing and convincing the Leave voters, and despite Nigel Farage and UKip having exaggerated the reality of facts and dismissed the serious implications for the UK, it still is a real issue and an enduring crisis.

The consequences of leaving the EU, despite the necessity of it to be reformed, are going to be profound for the UK as well as for the EU itself. Theresa May knows this perfectly well, and her detachment from the heat of the battle would provide the cool-headed, pragmatic leadership that this country needs in these very turbulent, uncertain times.

 

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